Repost and comment of Psychedelics and Depression

Psilocybin is a natural compound found in some mushrooms. While you just read about the promise of this psychedelic for the management of depression,…

Psychedelics and Depression

— The nature of reality, and thus our ability to perceive and conceive of it, is infinitely larger that our sciences will ever accommodate. Similarly, human consciousness functions by mechanisms which will always exceed current scientific physical models.

Mental health, or ill mental health, as opposed to physical health, is determined at all times by two asymmetrical components:

– Conventional-ideological norms

And

– universal affect

As a method of treatment, they are incompatible and non-reconcilable. But, they can be used together to find a way through. As well, conventional norms can be imposed beyond their proper dimensions.

Healing is not fixing. The attempt to fix someone who suffers from a mental health issue is an effort to reintegrate them into the conventional norms. Psychedelics, by their very nature, are healing medicine, not fixing, medicine.

I think a basic question for someone who would understand themselves as depressed, as opposed to being diagnosed, would be: do you feel that you need to be fixed?

Often, people who are suffering from “depression” feel that they need to be fixed. The help they seek is therefore often oriented towards other people who might understand what’s going on with them, and help to fix them. This really opens up the door for a whole population of people to be exploited — the helper by virtue of being misled, and the person needing help by having an only option of conventional helping — as indeed our healthcare system in America at least is indeed generated and based on exploitation. But we can have a discussion about that elsewhere; it is what it is, right?

We have to be careful about how we figure and designate cause of mental phenomena.

If we are truly interested and helping people that are having difficulties living their life, a basic question Hass to be whether we are trying to get them to return to being a normal human being, or whether we are trying to help that person come to terms with who and what they actually are.

In our current epistemological paradigm for health, the answer is routinely that we’re trying to get them back to normal. Despite what every day philosophical thinkers would want to criticize about the concept of being normal, nevertheless, often enough their criticism Appears more like an argument that there is a standard of normalcy. These Fein and dodge questions and answers bring in to light Mental health stigma and that’s how even the people who want to help the most are approaching it through an inherent bias which tends to refi that this person who might be depressed is actually wrong, that the person is incorrect, and that they need to return back to normal.

I have a deep skepticism about investigating psychedelics as a treatment for mental health issues through the conventional scientific apparatus.  This is because the nature of the psychedelic experience Opens knowledge and understanding to a universe that is exponentially larger than scientific reckoning would have it be. Scientific knowledge as we currently view it tends to shut things down, it reduces to itself and creates larger problems often enough in the effort to solve what was initially a very small problem.

I’m not saying that I dislike science or that I think that it’s not finding useful things. But I am saying that our blind reliance upon it, or unquestioning allegiance to its methods, might be miss placed.

Conventional Citizens

This means that we need to be careful about lumping individual instances of mental health issues into flat generalized categories of kind and type. Particularly, with each person that might be suffering, it would be prudent to get an understanding of whether this person is conventionally oriented, or not.

For example, if someone is Christian, I’m not going to try to heal their spiritual well-being by referring to Buddhist maxims or another religions beliefs system. It would cause more harm to approach the Christian by merely using Christian tropes while underneath implying that their belief system is superstitious and irrational.

Similarly, if a person is oriented upon the truths of ideological scientific fact, then we might not refer them to a healing of individual self, but might be more effective and helping to refer such people back to being a normal person, back into the social fold as an ideological congregant.

However, we might see that the more persistent depressions are actually a case where the individual is missing themselves for the sake of such ideological norms.x

How do you see yourself? w

Reposting How Psychedelics Could Help Cure Various Mental-Health Disorders | by Viktor Marchev

It’s amazing how psychedelics — from being initially known as the ‘party drugs’ and excessively being connected to the ‘underground’—are now seen as …

How Psychedelics Could Help Cure Various Mental-Health Disorders | by Viktor Marchev | ILLUMINATION | May, 2021

—- I am having a like/dislike relationship with the psychedelic frontier of treating mental disorders. Its not a Love/hate relationship, it is definitely a like/ dislike.

Let’s see if I can explain my ambiguity.

The psychedelic experience is so unlike any other experience someone can have, whether it be from introducing a chemical substance into one’s body or otherwise. , At its core, the psychedelic experience is a complete unanchoring of experience from what we generally understand as reality. But not only that, for, It seems to me that people who have not fully engaged with the potential of the psychedelic experience tend to reduce that experience to a real action. This is to say there is an incredible duplicity and large irony involved in the experience itself, and so to eliminate the incredulity which is inherent to the psychedelic experience, is to reduce the psychedelic experience to something that it is innately not part of. This activity somehow offends me deeply. This is a part of the “dislike” part of my attitude.

On the other hand, the “like” part of my attitude really stems from the fact that the insight which defies the very definition of what insight might be for mental health thereby compels me to understand that most people with mental health issues will not be able to comprehend such insight. So it is that I must acknowledge that there may be some sort of initial and profound help that can be gained through a scientific approach of using various psychedelic – in The loose sense of a group chemical compounds – in the effort for mental health. I am open to psychedelics potential for treating mental health issues.

However, there is another part of the “dislike” part of my attitude and it really Has to do, again, with the all too quick reduction to scientific empirical truth.

From a Pure philosophical perspective, it is possible to conceptualize the action of psychedelics on mental health as the opposite of what empirical science will Tell us. Philosophy addresses the foundations of what it is to exist, what it is to be and what it is to know. From a conflation of those standpoints it is just as likely that a transformation in my view upon the world would influence a neurochemical State.

My dislike tends to stem from an apprehension where we might transform the empirical neurochemistry and translate into an improvement of mental health in the sense that we would want to believe, as opposed to what is actually occurring. We might be all too ready to see statistical improvement as support for developing psychedelic compounds in the treatment of mental health yet more in the interest of money and big business, more in the interest of people who like to get high believing what science says to their support, rather than what is actually occurring for the person with the mental health issue.

Which is to say, a 30% improvement (whatever that might mean) upon mental health from the approach of empirical Science Might be selling short the potential for what psychedelics are actually capable of achieving for mental health, that is, approached from the other way, approached from the standpoint that a fundamental change in the way that we are viewing the world necessarily corresponds with the change in neurochemistry. A change in the way I view things might have 100% effect on my mental health in a Beneficial Way And might appear to alter my neurochemistry in whatever way, but to approach it from the neurochemical side — empiricism simply does not have the bandwidth, it’s simply does not have the bit depth. 

I am concerned that those who see a promise in psychedelics will be all too quick to side with compromise Because it makes them happy that The statistics seems to confirm what they believed was right. From my experience, the psychedelic experience is not about being right, it is about understanding. Hence my comment about insight. 

Nevertheless, in the same way that we legalized marijuana, it may be that we have to approach a psychedelic treatment for mental health similarly. This is to indicate that the reason why marijuana is legal today is not because science proved anything good about it. We wanted marijuana legal because we saw and see the benefit of marijuana in actual lives, and so we used whatever leverage we could get, whether it be religious, which actually came first, or science or history. But ultimately it is neither religion nor science nor history which has allowed us as a country at least to want to smoke weed legally. Science and religion are extraneous, even though for our purposes we have to pretend that they are primary. alcohol is not legal because any sort of benefit except that we like it. Translating this imperative to psychedelics moves along a slightly different trajectory, but categorically it is the same to the same. As I have said, we can treat mental health by trying to alleviate symptoms and think that we’re doing good. Ok. We probably are doing some good. But I feel that we are leaving out the more significant in a profound implications of psychedelics in mental Health by merely leaving it to “what helps”.

Hopefully this is just a sentiment and not what is actually occurring. 

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… And I didn’t even mention the problem with “curing” mental illness. I’m just leaving that be for the benefit of doubt. And, you can look to my earlier post about that one.

Psychological Flexibility and Psychedelic Therapy

This was originally published on EntheoNation. It’s been said in a number of different ways, perhaps for as long as psychedelics have been around: …

Psychological Flexibility and Psychedelic Therapy

————- “We teach flexibility over rigid Ness.”

Lately, many people have been pondering the notion that mental issues and mental disorders Are brought about due to A fixed set of ideas of how things are supposed to be.

The most rigid of these ideas is what we know of as identity. The mechanism is not often easily understood, simply because we as human beings tend to consolidate this sense of self, this “I” as indeed “me” which is the locus whereby thoughts, emotions, and actions coalesce necessarily.

It is from this center of self, so to speak, from which then we assume to be able to negotiate or somehow compensate for what the world gives us. In essence, we are constantly reifying the notion that there is a self as opposed to the world, and so if something isn’t going correctly it’s either something that is wrong with me, or something that is wrong with the world.

The newer kind of approach breaks from this fixed ontological ideal.

At first, we tend to approach it from the outside. We tend not to approach from this “fixed center”. Because typically human beings are pretty much locked into this notion of real truth. And so millimeter by millimeter, layer by layer, we tend to try and work from the outside in to hopefully allow the “dysfunction” or the “issue” to resolve itself fundamentally, which is to say that the “innermost self” will flex a little bit, will change a little bit of it substance such that the issue will lessen or go away.

Upon the action of psychedelics, it seems this rigid fixed center might be more readily available and open to an understanding of itself that is less concrete, less attached to other aspects it encounters and draws into its orbit in order to create identity.

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