The Culture of Cultures: An example of how the explanatory term of mental health begins to account for all human endeavor

Too Much and Never Enough: How My Family Created the World’s Most Dangerous Man: 9781982141462: Trump Ph.D., Mary L.: Books
— Read on www.amazon.com/Too-Much-Never-Enough-Dangerous/dp/1982141468/ref=nodl_

—– Just an example; perhaps motivated by a little Justice as well. 😙

Nonetheless; this is an example of how the cult of individualism is being accounted for sufficiently to only allow for two responses. 

Accept it. The rationale behind mental health and its capacity of overwhelming explanatory power leaves even the most ardent skeptic to accept at least some of its truth, and work with it.

Deny it. Explanatory power of the trope of mental health can only be denied. This is to say, it’s explanatory power hits home. This effect on people, which is to say, due to parts of its power for making sense, brings about a response of rejection.

Similar to when someone notices something about us that we are trying to protect, and we feel embarrassment, so it is that the explanatory power of mental health reaches into our very nature, indeed, describes the cult of individualism to the extent that those who adhere to it as an ontological truth have nothing to do but to reject it and indeed fight against it. In the end, unfortunate and ironic, all they have left is recourse to violence.

This is a focal issue of Modernity: The issue of The Two Routes. 

This question is salient: How do I find my individual self without the multiplicity of beings to show me the way to where I am?

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