The Postmodern Ethical Dilemma.

When we look at what Philosophy does through history, we might see that it is a more complicit role than a activist role. Philosophies of activism are necessarily divisional, so we can understand why philosophy appears more complicit.

When we attempt to situate ethics in such complicitphilosophies, we may find that there has been an infatuation with how to ground ethics. Despite what traditional lineage we might posit for thousands of years, it is possible to find in more local features problems of manifestations involved with transcendence and immenence.  In short; in one moment philosophy attempts to ground ethics in an absolute transcendence with momentary or event ruptures in the fabric of experience and existence, what we call in religion “prophetic” but intuition nonetheless and even inspiration, and then in another moment, which more closely can be associated with our postmodern moment, The concern becomes imminence , as a kind of total being or entire experience justified in itself. The problem with these kind of polemics is that they are really religious postures. The only way to argue against this is to remove oneself from the object of thought; basically the only way to argue against that the philosophical concepts however constructed, of transcendence and immenence, are theological ideals is to argue ones ground and transcendence or imminence. 

The problem with these debates is that ethics never finds a ground; rather the ground is currently theoretical and thus religious. It always passes it’s a good against a bad a me against you an us and them. 

So it is here that we find the problem with postmodern ethics. The very nature of postmodernity is human inclusion and the attempt to re-join or incorporate what is other into the state (of being). This is why it has become so difficult to separate out liberal relativity, human equality, cultural relativism and Generalinclusion from having a definite and ethical position on things. This is because when we stick to the postmodern conclusion, and it is a conclusion and end a no exit a futility a nihilism, we find that we’re perpetually opening ourselves up to the possibility of this other and what they might believe in with their ethical conclusions might be that it is almost like some sort of ethical mandate that I am not allowed to have my own definite ethics upon any situation. And this is because I’m always considering what the other person might think; I grow afraid to posit my ethical definitions for fear of being labelled a racist or a bigot or sexist or any of the -ists and – isms that people so often come up with to define how someone is ethically incorrect by asserting their ethics. Because of our ‘liberal deconstruction’ even the term ‘racism’ has become virtually meaningless. What about just plain ‘we do not tolerate your ignorance based hate and violence anymore’. Does that mean anything? I’m not sure it does. 

It is well known nowadays that the often the postmodern ideal is really just mushy accusation of guilt imposed upon another person for not being ‘inclusive’ or “tolerant”.  The problem is is that postmodernism has argued itself into a relativity of terms that it is almost as if the very idea of inclusion and tolerance have no meaning. This is why we find nowadays people saying that the liberal left has gone all the way around the spectrum and now is appearing as if they are conservative right.  For example the ridiculousness up in Evergreen Washington, where a tradition of racial inclusion finally developed into an ethically institutionalizedactivity of racial Exclusion, such that a professor who didn’t want to participate found himself the object of what we could call radically insane and buyersethical norms, The very thing that this professor if not the school itself was trying to educate people against.

At some point we need to get over that human inclusion means that we can’t ethically condemn certain practises that are based in an obvious educational void, and obvious lacking of what we should surely call intelligence. 

And I mean this in response to the Charlottesville incident. Our president is using the wishy-washy postmodern relativity as a means to hedges bets for future voters. He himself may not be an ideological racist but he is definitely the De facto racist by abusing philosophical Rhetoric that really is a distortion of what postmodernity is really means.

The same way , I had a small discussion with somebody about how popular culture usurps and commandeers the meaning of terms, for example “meme” and “radical”, we are leading our country become unethical in the spirit of America, which is to say the principle of human inclusion. We do not have to ride this out and tolerate hate and violence just because were seeing those ethical expressions within the context of our ethical wish wash. 

At some point we need to pull ourselves out of our politically correct postmodern enlightened asses and decide if the ethics that we actually talk about we really mean in a true human sense. 

Because the real postmodern/liberal/tolerant position is one that says “I am going to hang onto my ethical position of tolerance and I am going to allow you to enact violent and speak violently and hatefully about other human beings because God will provide and it will all turn out for the good”. This is exactly the attitude that brought the possibility of someone like Trump being elected. God provided exactly what was contrary to ethical humanity. It is exactly the postmodern ideal that somehow the words we use create our reality that have allowed us to void the fact that we’re just sitting back and waiting for God to provide. Well he did provide; any provided us the conditions to pull our heads out of our assholes. Lol. 

5 thoughts on “The Postmodern Ethical Dilemma.

  1. Great post! I just reblogged this- I think you are really onto something. You know the day after Charlottesville, I had the chance to visit the MLK center in Atlanta, and I met MLK’s daughter. It just makes me realize how postmodernity has changed the ethical landscape- nonviolence is seen as kitsch or something. The night of the Charlottesville incident, I watched a documentary on Nietzsche and rethought the whole “death of God” thing. It’s exactly what you are talking about, I was going to make a post about Nietzsche and Charlottesville (I probably will eventually), but you already took all my ideas!

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